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HPC Research and Education News for the Week of May 25, 2015 Sponsored by XSEDE

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New Research from Rice, Johns Hopkins and Columbia Universities: How the Human Brain Separates the Ability to Talk and Write

While the human ability to write evolved from the ability to speak, writing and speaking are supported by entirely different parts of the brain, according to new research from Rice University, Johns Hopkins University and Columbia University.  The research shows that it is possible for stroke victims who cannot speak a grammatically correct sentence to write it perfectly, and vice versa.  “Modality and Morphology: What We Write May Not Be What We Say” is available online and will appear in an upcoming edition of the journal Psychological Science. The paper focuses on the rel...

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George Lucas Foundation Grants $5M to MSU for Science, Math and Literacy Education

Michigan State University researchers and their partners plan to create a model for teaching elementary students science while also improving their skills in math, reading and writing. The project is funded by a five-year, $5 million grant from Lucas Education Research, a division of the George Lucas Educational Foundation. Executive Director Kristin De Vivo said the goal is to bring the benefits of project-based learning – an approach that encourages kids to explore real-world problems – to more classrooms throughout the nation. Joseph Krajcik, director of Michigan State’s CREATE f...

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Simulating Seasons: UT Austin Researchers Use Supercomputing to Assess the Impact of Climate Change on the Country's Growing Season

Malawi, a small landlocked country in southeast Africa, is home to 13 million people and is one of the least-developed countries in the world. As a nation that relies on subsistence farming, its security is highly dependent on rain-fed agriculture, including the crops maize, rice, and sweet potatoes. Changes in rainfall patterns associated with climate change can be devastating to people living in the country, leading to food crises, famines, and loss of life. Two researchers at The University of Texas at Austin, Kerry Cook and Edward (Ned) Vizy, are dedicated to understanding how climate...

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ORNL Demonstrates First Large-Scale Graphene Fabrication

One of the barriers to using graphene at a commercial scale could be overcome using a method demonstrated by researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Graphene, a material stronger and stiffer than carbon fiber, has enormous commercial potential but has been impractical to employ on a large scale, with researchers limited to using small flakes of the material. Now, using chemical vapor deposition, a team led by ORNL’s Ivan Vlassiouk has fabricated polymer composites containing 2-inch-by-2-inch sheets of the one-atom thick hexagonally arranged carbon atom...

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Smartphone Video Microscope Automates Detection of Parasites in Blood: UC Berkeley Study

A research team led by UC Berkeley engineers has developed a new smartphone microscope that uses video to automatically detect and quantify infection by parasitic worms in a drop of blood. This next generation of UC Berkeley’s CellScope technology could help revive efforts to eradicate debilitating filarial diseases in Africa by providing critical information to health providers in the field. The UC Berkeley engineers teamed up with Dr. Thomas Nutman from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and collaborators from Cameroon and France to develop the device. ...

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TAKING PLACE TODAY: Smart Cyberinfrastructure for Big Data Processing

May 21, 2015 - Urbana–Champaign, Illinois

The landscape of cyberinfrastructure for research is rapidly changing. There is a move towards virtualized and programmable infrastructure. The cloud paradigm enables applications to use computing resources at different places and optimize workflows in either bringing computing to the data or the other way around. Programmable networks allow networks to be utilized in unprecedented ways to create application specific Internets. This talk presents the latest developments in the Research and Education Networks to support...

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Vince Betro Leaving XSEDE

Vince Betro will be leaving NICS and XSEDE. XSEDE would like to personally thank Vince for his contributions to many, many XSEDE activities, including Training, User Engagement, Outreach, and the Campus Champions program. A special thanks to Vince for leading a Training effort that has made tremendous progress in less than a year.

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UC San Diego Physicist Frank Würthwein Joins SDSC

University of California, San Diego Professor Frank Würthwein, an expert in high-energy particle physics and advanced computation, has joined the university’s San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to help implement a high-capacity data cyberinfrastructure across all UC campuses. Würthwein, who joined UC San Diego as a physics professor in 2003, was recently named executive director of the Open Science Grid (OSG) project, a multi-disciplinary research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. He was OSG’s founding executive during 2005. ...

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SDSC Summer Institute (SI) 2015: HPC for the Long Tail of Science- Apply Now!

August 10 – 14, 2015 – La Jollla, California
`Priority Applications Due - May 29 2015, notification by June 5

Applications are being accepted for the SDSC Summer Institute (SI) 2015: HPC for the Long Tail of Science.  The Summer Institute will provide a weeklong education and training program in High Performance and Data Intensive Computing. The first half of the Summer Institute will consist of plenary sessions covering essential skills including data management, running jobs on SDSC resources, reproducibility, database systems,...

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Nepal Disaster Relief Efforts to Be Aided By Glacier Researchers: Supercomputers, Terrain-Mapping Techniques Employed In Urgent Efforts

Researchers who normally use high-resolution satellite imagery to study glaciers are using their technology this week to help with disaster relief and longer-term stabilization planning efforts related to the recent earthquake in Nepal. On April 25, a violent earthquake struck central Nepal, killing more than 7,000 people and destroying hundreds of thousands of homes. The deadliest earthquake in Nepal since 1934, the tremor killed at least 19 climbers and crew on Mount Everest and reportedly produced casualties in the adjoining countries of Bangladesh, China and India. Two research teams ...

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